Tag Archives: children

Choosing a Nursery

After deciding which school or nursery you would like to visit, and the appointments have been made, it is important to ask the right questions to determine the correct place for your child.

Below we’ve listed some of the questions you may want to ask when visiting a nursery based on:

The environment

Is the school/nursery clean?
Is it well-maintained and organised?
Will your child be safe?
Are the toys in a good condition?
Is this a part of a chain of nurseries, or is it independent?
Is the nursery convenient to get to and leave from?

The atmosphere

Are the children happy and enjoying themselves?
Are the staff members nurturing and caring?
Would you consider the children active and busy, or controlled and directed?

Speak to other parents if possible, there should be a lively atmosphere.

The routine

What would a typical day entail?
Is there a variety of activities including, creative play, sitting down activities, free play and time for rest?
When is nap time, where is it held and how long for? Does the facility have an outdoor play area and if not, are there periods the children will be taken out?

The discipline policy

How would bad behaviour be handled?
What is the discipline policy?
Are well-behaved children rewarded?

The staff’s qualifications

What are the credentials of the teaching staff?
What’s the amount of fully qualified staff that teach here?

The curriculum and Ofsted inspections

Can you view a recent Ofsted report if there is one?
Will your child be able to understand the curriculum?

The food, medicine, and care policies

Are the children given anything to eat if anything, at break times?
Are their dietary and allergy needs that are catered for?
Is there a nurse and does she have a medicine policy? (Nurses are able to administer antibiotics, excluding Calpol and cough medicine, if they have a medicine book.)
Will your child need nappies?

The parent/teacher relationships

Does the school have a flexible attitude to new children and parents like a gradual entry policy?
Are there reports to keep parent’s updated with their child’s progress?
Will there be times when the head teacher is available to talk to parents at the start or the end of each day?
Will there be advice given to parents to encourage their child following the child’s development at the school/nursery?

Anything else

You can ask for the policy on late collections; will there be a charge?
Check whether nappies, dance classes, uniforms, swimming classes, meals and anything else will have an extra charge.
Is the nursery flexible? Will you be able to make up missed days if your child is ill or isn’t available for any other reasons?
Does the nursery give any refunds?
Will there be any extra cost in closing periods or bank holidays?
Is there a fee for deposit and registration?
How far in advance would these fees be due?

Lastly, questions will help you determine some of the basics of a nursery, however, be sure to trust your own instinct on whether you believe your child will thrive and prosper in that particular nursery.
Please visit our website for more information about Rowans Nursery!

Nursery rhymes help children learn

Nursery rhymes create a big impact on children, more than parents may thing – many question the purpose of nursery rhymes; other than being extremely repetitive, what is the point?

Literacy and child development experts have found that a child that knows roughly eight nursery rhymes and can recite them by heart before they’re four, it’s likely that they will be a skilled reader and speller in their classes by the time thy are in Year 3.

Why?

Phonic skills – Nursery rhymes allow children to develop early phonic skills, which is the ability to identify, hear and manipulate letter sounds. Quite a few schools actually use phonics as one of the main ways to teach reading.

Practice – They allow children to practice pitch, volume and language variation – when asking a question and retelling a story to friends, tone needs to be changed and children will have to learn that.

Imagination – Nursery rhymes have been said to expand a child’s imagination which is understandable with stories of eggs sitting on walls alike.

Sequence – The rhymes follow clear sequences of events starting with a beginning, middle and then an end. These will be among the first ‘stories’ you child will be able to understand.

Vocabulary – Of course, the repetition of the nursery rhymes will help them stick in the child’s brain and will broaden their vocabulary as they learn to interpret the words for themselves.

Fun – Most importantly, they’re fun! For a child, learning new things is fun, and paired with a catchy song, they will enjoy learning.

If you want to send your child to nursery, visit our website!

Is your child ready for nursery?

Is your child ready for nursery?

A vital part of a child’s development and growth is when they first go to nursery. Children start at a number of different ages, but it’s common for children around the ages of 2+ to begin their schooling career. Readiness in nursery doesn’t just come with age, it’ll naturally develop over time. Is your child socially confident, emotionally ready and physically capable of going to nursery? Find out in our latest blog!

Has your little one spent time away from you?

If your child is used to being in the care of a babysitter or a relative, for example, when you’re at work, they’re more likely to be better prepared to spend time away from you, giving them a huge advantage when they considered to be starting nursery. Children who are used to being away from both parents are more likely to go straight into nursery and not struggle on their first day or weeks. If this isn’t something your child has experienced, try to schedule some time away from them – they could spent time with grandparents or relatives.

If you don’t have the pleasure of leaving your little one with a family member or friend, then not to worry: it’s also common for some children to go into nursery on their first day without so much as a look back.

The ultimate trick is to help your children adjust to the change in small doses, compared to one big go. A number of nurseries will allow to you drop off your children a while before the opening times on their first few days at the nursery, so they can get adjusted to their new environment, letting them gradually work up to a full day of fun!

Is your little one quite independent?

Nursery can be difficult for most, but if your child holds certain skills, even at a basic level, it’ll give them a major advantage when trying to adapt to nursery life. If your child is potty trained, they’re more likely to be accepted into a nursery, as this is a common requirement. Your son/daughter should be able to take care of their own basic needs, like cleaning their hands after doing activities involving paint, sand, glue etc, eating their lunch without the help of an adult and even sleeping by themselves.

Does your child hold a schedule?

Nursery children, although doing various activities day to day, will often hold a set schedule in their time at nursery: circle time, play time, snacks, fun on the playground and then lunch. This system is implemented for good reason; children tend to feel more comfortable with a situation when they’re going through the same routine at the same time each day.

If your child doesn’t have their own schedule at which they eating, play and sleep, it could help to implement a routine just before nursery in order to help their learning schedule. Offering your child meals at a regular time is a great start!

You could plan to visit the park, relatives, play in the garden and even have a bathroom routine. This is where a child will learn the best, as they’ll have a bath, read books or play with toys and then go to bed.

Is your child ready for nursery physically?

You may be looking at the screen with bemusement right now, because what could “physically” mean?
Children are incredibly busy throughout their nursery life; they visit a number of places, learn, play and explore. This can be a tiring challenge for any child, so if you find that your child takes these activities with ease, they may be ready for nursery. But, if they have trouble moving on from one activity to another and instead get upset/angry, this could indicate your child isn’t fully prepared for nursery.

The physical side of the analysis comes in when your child needs to sleep. Nursery child will often have a nap time, which is usually after lunch, but if your little can’t stretch through to this time, they may not be ready.

You can work towards the improvement of their stamina by making sure he gets a good sleep routine implemented. Also, you could have them do more activities in the day, which will mimic the routine of nursery life and improve their energy levels whilst helping them deal with routines.

Is your child ready for nursery? Call us for a chat about your little one and their learning path!

We’d like to wish everybody a very Happy Christmas, we wish you all the best in the festive period.

How were nurseries invented?

Nurseries are common place in the modern day, but where did they first originate?

The concept of the nursery has been one that started in the 1800’s. Today, it’s common place for young children to attend a nursery in order to further their development and help prepare them for their academic career. So, with the idea of nurseries being widely accepted in modern day, just how did they get started? Find out in our latest blog!

The UK started a trend…

The idea of schooling children has been around for a while in the UK before Margaret McMillan, a Christian with an approach on child development, had the idea of not only had the idea of teaching children but also toddlers and younger. Swapping the concept of sense training and health focus for that of play and self-activity, McMillan introduced a whole new range of child development techniques used in the 1800’s. She’s widely regarded as the originator of the Nursery schooling concept, being a driving force behind child education at the time. Margaret’s sister, Rachel McMillan, also helped her sibling with the nursery concept, opening an open-air nursery in a rundown area of London in 1913. It was around that time that similar methods of teaching would develop in countries such as the USA and Italy, aiming to provide educational methods of aid to children living in poverty.

The development of American nurseries

The idea of nurseries spread rapidly throughout the United States, although the first nursery schools to be built were all privately financed, often being sponsored by universities across the country. Each nursery held a different approach towards the education of children and this was clear to see in their methods of child study. Unlike the nurseries across the UK, American establishments would cater towards the upper and middle-class children of society, whose mothers weren’t participating in paid labour. In the 1920s, the co-op nursery school was developed in the United States, something that focused on the parents aiding in the running of the nursery.

Although the idea of nursery schooling was widely accepted by the public education system throughout the 20th century, the concept was limited in its resources through its cost and the idea that the best place for children to be, when under schooling age, would be at home with their mother. Exceptions were made for children in poor urban areas and also in times of national emergency, notably in both the Great Depression and WWII.

The development of nurseries would continue for a number of years after, with projects like “War on Poverty” aiming to directly fund the educational aspect of children across their respective country and even the world. The continued increase in this area has seen the schooling systems of countries worldwide deliver outstanding knowledge and preparation to children everywhere.

So, what do you think? Is a nursery a vital part of a child’s education and can it be used to give them an advantage in early life?

Let us know in the comments below!

For more on nurseries, their history, prices, applications and more, please visit our website here.

Five top reasons for sending your child to a nursery

So, why exactly should you send your little ones to nursery?

It promotes social activities

One of the main benefits of sending your child to nursery is the preparation it has on your child school life. Depending on where you send your child, nursery’s aren’t specifically the most cost effective places in the world, yet the social benefit is gives your children is immense. They’re mixing with children in their own age group, so they’ll be much better equipped to dealing with other children when the time comes.

It’s always good to find a balance in this sense, as although nursery is a fantastic place for your children to be, they’ll still need to spend time with parents.

Get more quality time with your little ones

As they all say, absence makes the heart grow fonder… right? Having time away from your little ones is not only good for you, as you’ll be able to spend some time on yourself, but you’ll also feel way more relaxed with them when they come home, giving yourself more energy and more time to play with them.

There's lots of fun to be had at nursery for your little ones!

There’s lots of fun to be had at nursery for your little ones!

Potty training may become easier?

It’s possible that, whilst at nursery, your little ones can pick up more skills than you would’ve thought possible. For example, did you know that children can become more accepting of the idea of potty training whilst at nursery?

Nursery staff reinforce the idea of potty training to your children time and time again, so when it comes to it they should take to it with more ease and understanding. Although we’re not saying that potty training is the main reason you should send your child to nursery, it certainly is a massive help when trying to explain to your children the importance of using a potty.

Encourages playing and sharing

The good thing about sending your children to nursery is that it’ll increase their love of being outdoors, as well as giving them time to be active. A toddler who is active is more likely to remain active later on in life, so it’s important to encourage your children to be active both indoors and outdoors.

The benefits of ‘messy play’

One of the biggest benefits of sending your little one to nursery is that they can have as much messy play as they want, and the best thing is, you don’t have to be the one to clean it up! Now, children can have a form of messy play at home, as we’re sure there are walls in your home that can show evidence of this, but at the same time children can experience a wider range of messy play at nursery than they can at home, with activities including water, paint, paper, glue and sand.

So, what do you think? Are you convinced? Would you send your child to nursery based on this?

For more information regarding nursery, its benefits for your children, questions and more, please visit our website!

How to prepare your child for nursery

What can you do to prepare your child for their first day at nursery?

The first day at nursery for your children can be incredibly difficult, not just for the children but also for yourself. Use these fantastic tips to help ease the pressure and make it easier for your child to be happy at preschool.

Boost their confidence

Socialising is a skill that we all need, as humans, for basic communication. It’s the basis of our development and whilst we all naturally learn it, it can take some children a lot longer to learn their social skills compared to others. If you can teach your child the idea of taking turns with toys and sharing them to others, they should have a much better time settling into nursery. Be patient, as children won’t learn right away that sharing is needed. Always remind your children to be friendly and share, as children are bound to squabble over toys. If you don’t know many mothers with children, you can always join a mother and toddler group, which is a fantastic way of introducing your child into socialising with other kids.

Having a friend may help them settle into the nursery environment

Having a friend may help them settle into the nursery environment

Teach them basic skills

If your child is going to be eating at nursery, it’s a good idea to teach them the basics of feeding themselves. They’re going to have to use a knife and fork, so practise with them at home. Don’t expect your child to be able to cut their own food up, as nursery staff will do this for them. Also, make them aware of any allergies you child may have to avoid icky tummies!

Make visits prior to their start date

Like anything, your child will need to familiarise with their new environments before they’ll begin to feel content about spending time in the nursery. You should try and book visits to the nursery before consider starting their, just to see how they cope with spending time away from you for a few hours. When you get back, be sure to talk with your child about how great the school will be, what they’ll do their, what trips they’ll go on etc.

Their start day may be difficult, so here’s how to cope!

Allow plenty of time for your child to get settled before leaving instantly. Go into the nursery with them; make sure they’re comfortable and relaxed, as this should hopefully allow you to avoid unnecessary crying!

It’s perfectly natural to feel a little emotional at the site of your child going into nursery, but don’t let it show. Children will pick up on your feelings of negativity.

Be honest with your little one, as they’ll know when you’re telling fibs! Explain to them that you’ll be back at a certain time and you’ll see them very soon.

Do you have any tips you’d like to add? Tell them to us in the comments below!

For more on nursery vacancies, please visit our website.

Why should you send your child to nursery?

We answer the question why should you send your child to a nursery!

Research suggests children benefit academically

A study was conducted by the University of London in the Summer of 2013, looking into the academic advancements of children who had nursery experience. It found that children who spent three or more years in nursery educations were more likely to have advancement in their academic ability by up to a year, compared to parents who keep their children home until the age of five. It also found a positive connection between the amount of time a child spends in Nursery and how they perform in later life.

It outlined that children put into the nursery system at two years old were at least 10 months ahead of their fellow peers. This shrinks to six months if a child goes into nursery at the age of three.

Nursery life helps social development

Children are, in most cases, predominantly curious at the best of times. They want to explore their surroundings, seeing what’s going on around them, asking endless questions in the process so they can actively take in new information. If you put them in an environment outside of the home, children will get a whole load of new experiences, meeting other children of diverse backgrounds which spikes their curiosity. It’s apparent that in children who have no nursery experience, they’re mostly quiet and reserved, replacing their curiosity with shyness.

Similarly to when they grow up, children are at their happiest when they’re around other children their own age. The earlier they learn to join in with activities aimed to bond them with others, the quicker they develop their co-operative skills, becoming happier and more confident in the process.

Nurseries in Birmingham

Nursery gives children to opportunity to develop

A daily routine is vital for life

It’s a good idea for children to understand the need for a daily routine at a young age, as this will help them all the way through their lives. School and work both require a daily routine, being in on time, doing work and prioritising daily tasks. Being at school, children will stick to a timetable, which will ensure their learning process allows for the maximum knowledge to be taken in.

There’s a number of things parents can do to help their child adopt a routine that holds a level of self-discipline. This will help the child cope with their day-to-day routine and life. Having children get out of bed at a set time in the morning and going to sleep at similar hours will help tune their ‘body clock’, instilling a level of subconscious knowledge that will get them out of bed in the morning.

These foundations are layed out for children in nursery, as it now only shows your little ones the importance of a routine, it aids them in coping with the changes they will face growing up, which puts them considerable steps ahead when they begin school.

In conclusion

What it boils down to is what you ultimately think is better for your child, so the choice is completely down to you, the parents. Nursery offers a balanced life for your child, as well as giving you time to look after yourself. Ultimately, the most important thing to consider will be the staff, environment, learning and activities they will experience in their nursery lives. We can offer your child a fantastic learning experience that will mould them into fine students later in life.

If you wish to discuss this more, please visit our Nurseries in Birmingham or call us on 0121 354 1752.